The Health-Wealth Connection 

It's a vicious cycle: Money is one of the greatest causes of stress, prolonged stress can lead to serious health issues, and health issues often result in yet more financial struggles.¹ The clear connection between health and wealth is why it's so important to develop and maintain lifelong plans to manage both. 

The big picture 

Consider the following statistics:

1. More than 20% of Americans say they have either considered skipping or skipped going to the doctor due to financial worries. (American Psychological Association, 2015) 

2. More than half of retirees who retired earlier than planned did so because of their own health issues or to care for a family member. (Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2017)

3. Chronic diseases such as heart disease, type 2 diabetes, obesity, and arthritis are among the most common, costly, and preventable of all health problems. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017)

4. Chronic conditions make you more likely to need long-term care, which can cost anywhere from $21 per hour for a home health aide to more than $6,000 a month for a nursing home. (Department of Health and Human Services, 2017)

5. A 65-year-old married couple on Medicare with median prescription drug costs would need about $265,000 to have a 90% chance of covering their medical expenses in retirement. (Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2017)

Develop a plan for long-term health ...

The recommendations for living a healthy lifestyle are fairly straightforward: eat right, exercise regularly, don't smoke or engage in other risky behaviors, limit soda and alcohol consumption, get enough sleep (at least seven hours for most adults), and manage stress. And before embarking on any new health-related endeavor, talk to your doctor, especially if you haven't received a physical exam within the past year. Your doctor will benchmark important information such as  weight, blood results and risk factors for developing chronic disease. Go to the appointment prepared to share your family's medical history, be honest about your daily habits, and set goals with your doctor. Your life depends on it!

Other specific tips from the Department of Health and Human Services include:

Nutrition: Current nutritional guidelines call for eating a variety of vegetables and whole fruits; whole grains; low-fat dairy; a wide variety of protein sources including lean meats, fish, eggs, legumes, and nuts; and healthy oils. Some medical professionals are hailing the long-term benefits of the so-called "Mediterranean diet." Details for a basic healthy diet and the Mediterranean diet can be found at health.gov/dietaryguidelines.

Exercise: Any physical activity is better than none. Inactive adults can achieve some health benefits from as little as 60 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity per week. However, the ideal target is at least 150 minutes of moderate-intensity or 75 minutes of high-intensity workouts per week. For more information, visit health.gov/paguidelines.